Peer Review 6

Posted to: http://www.jackpash.wordpress.com

Hi Jack!
I love how much effort you put into your post this week; your extensive research into the World in a Fool’s Cap image is really interesting- especially the translation of the writing. It would be interesting to investigate further into the idea that “know thyself” is related to the fool. Perhaps this could mean that by recognising that you are a fool yourself gives you a certain kind of wisdom. After all it was Shakespeare who said “A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.”
Keep up the great work!

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Peer Review 5

Posted to: http://www.sarasaladino.wordpress.com

Hey there Sara!
I love your interpretation of the first scene of 12th Night particularly the way you describe the pun on the word heart/hart and the metaphor of the deer. It would be really interesting if you further investigated the purpose of the techniques Shakespeare used- maybe the effect they had on the audience. I think one more interesting feature of this scene is the use of poetry. Poetry as well as the great techniques you picked up on make this a fantastic opening for a play- good one Shakespeare!

Peer Review 4

Posted to: http://www.beatricefait.wordpress.com

Hi Beatrice,
I really enjoyed the way you used language in your entry this week, it seemed almost mystical due to all the imagery used which is very fitting considering it is from the moon’s perspective. I completed the same question as you this week and it was so interesting to see the vast differences between our entries; yours was incredibly dire while I spoke about a world of wonder. Our pieces could almost work as a before and after sequence! The only tip I have is to double check for typos, they interupt your flow (eg: “Man is the craziest specie”).
Keep up the great work!

Peer Review 3

Posted to: https://jesseshakespeare.wordpress.com/

Hi Jesse!

I really enjoyed your analysis of Ralegh’s thoughts about death and the knowing of oneself. I loved the way that you paralleled this to receiving a credit card bill for all the extravagent materials you’ve been buying and then reflecting upon whether they were necessary at all- a situation many people know all too well.

It would be interesting to consider whether Ralegh’s statement is true for everyone- would an unrepentant criminal still experience the same realisation? Strangely enough, I think that more often than not, those who have led positive lives are more critical about themselves than the people who the realisation should effect most in their final moments.

I liked the questions you posed at the end of the post too, it would be interesting to hear what you think the answers might be!

Keep up the good work!

Peer Review 2

Posted to: https://daniel4946.wordpress.com

Hi again Daniel!
I really enjoyed the way you spoke about the expressive language Spenser uses to entice the audience and the examination of the allegory to England at the time. Something that you could further investigate is the sense of mystery Spenser uses to get the reader to continue onto Canto 1 after the prologue. I think that by outlining the heroic nature of the coming story but withholding details makes the reader want to continue and find out more about the knights,  monsters and faeries. This sense of mystery surrounding the heroic deeds tell us as readers that it truly is a worthwhile read.
Keep up the great work! Excited to see your future posts 🙂

Peer Review 1

Hi Ronny!
I enjoyed your blog post about the character of Richard III and your interpretation of why he wants to gain the throne. It is interesting that you say the primary reason for this is resentment of others for not being deformed. It would be interesting to examine other reasons for this such as him believing that he really was the next rightful heir after his brother died. I would also like to know whether you are sympathetic to Richard’s actions. Do you believe they are justifiable or at the very least, understandable, due to the way he had been treated because of his deformities? Or would you take the contrary side to this; that Richard was evil to the core?
Keep up the good work!

Posted to: https://ronnykamaledine.wordpress.com